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This mosaic of Jupiter was assembled from nine individual photos taken through an orange filter by Voyager 1 on Feb. 6, 1979, when the spacecraft was 4.7 million miles (7.8 million kilometers) from Jupiter.  Distortion of the mosaic, especially where portions of the limb have been fitted together, is caused by rotation of the planet during the 96-second intervals between individual pictures.  The large atmospheric feature just below and to the right of center is the Great Red Spot.  The complex structure of the cloud formations seen over the entire planet gives some hint of the equally complex motions in the Voyager 1 time-lapse photography.  The smallest atomospheric features seen in this view are approximately 85 miles (140 kilometers) across.  Voyager project is managed and controlled by Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science.  (JPL ref. No. P-21146) ARC-1979-A79-7029

This mosaic of Jupiter was assembled from nine individual photos taken through an orange filter by Voyager 1 on Feb. 6, 1979, when the spacecraft was 4.7 million miles (7.8 million kilometers) from Jupiter. Distortion of the mosaic, especially where portions of the limb have been fitted together, is caused by rotation of the planet during the 96-second intervals between individual pictures. The large atmospheric feature just below and to the right of center is the Great Red Spot. The complex structure of the cloud formations seen over the entire planet gives some hint of the equally complex motions in the Voyager 1 time-lapse photography. The smallest atomospheric features seen in this view are approximately 85 miles (140 kilometers) across. Voyager project is managed and controlled by Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science. (JPL ref. No. P-21146) ARC-1979-A79-7029

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Summary

This mosaic of Jupiter was assembled from nine individual photos taken through an orange filter by Voyager 1 on Feb. 6, 1979, when the spacecraft was 4.7 million miles (7.8 million kilometers) from Jupiter. Distortion of the mosaic, especially where portions of the limb have been fitted together, is caused by rotation of the planet during the 96-second intervals between individual pictures. The large atmospheric feature just below and to the right of center is the Great Red Spot. The complex structure of the cloud formations seen over the entire planet gives some hint of the equally complex motions in the Voyager 1 time-lapse photography. The smallest atomospheric features seen in this view are approximately 85 miles (140 kilometers) across. Voyager project is managed and controlled by Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science. (JPL ref. No. P-21146)

In 1977, Voyager 1 and 2 started their one-way journey to the end of the solar system and beyond, now traveling a million miles a day. Jimmy Carter was president when NASA launched two probes from Cape Canaveral. Voyager 1 and its twin, Voyager 2, were initially meant to explore Jupiter, Saturn, and their moons. They did that. But then they kept going at a rate of 35,000 miles per hour. Each craft bears an object that is a record, both dubbed the Golden Records. They were the product of Carl Sagan and his team who produced a record that would, if discovered by aliens, represent humanity and "communicate a story of our world to extraterrestrials."

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Date

28/02/1979
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Source

NASA
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