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Range :  4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) Ganymede is Jupiter's Largest Galilean satellites and 3rd from the planet.  Photo taken after midnight  Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less dense (twice the density of water).  Its surface brightness is 4 times of Earth's Moon.  Mare regions (dark features) are like the Moon's but have twice the brightness, and believed to be unlikely of rock or lava as the Moon's are.  It's north pole seems covered with brighter material and may be water frost.  Scattered brighter spots may be related to impact craters or source of fresh ice. ARC-1979-A79-7016

Range : 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) Ganymede is Jupiter's Largest Galilean satellites and 3rd from the planet. Photo taken after midnight Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less dense (twice the density of water). Its surface brightness is 4 times of Earth's Moon. Mare regions (dark features) are like the Moon's but have twice the brightness, and believed to be unlikely of rock or lava as the Moon's are. It's north pole seems covered with brighter material and may be water frost. Scattered brighter spots may be related to impact craters or source of fresh ice. ARC-1979-A79-7016

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Summary

Range : 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) Ganymede is Jupiter's Largest Galilean satellites and 3rd from the planet. Photo taken after midnight Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less dense (twice the density of water). Its surface brightness is 4 times of Earth's Moon. Mare regions (dark features) are like the Moon's but have twice the brightness, and believed to be unlikely of rock or lava as the Moon's are. It's north pole seems covered with brighter material and may be water frost. Scattered brighter spots may be related to impact craters or source of fresh ice.

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Date

01/03/1979
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Source

NASA
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