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Apulian Red-figure Volute Crater by Underworld Painter, depicting Hector's Farewell to Andromache, from Iliad, c. 340 BC (28632968992)

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Apulian Red-figure Volute Crater by Underworld Painter, depicting Hector's Farewell to Andromache, from Iliad, c. 340 BC (28632968992)

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Greek Gallery, Altes Museum, Berlin, Germany. Complete indexed photo collection at WorldHistoryPics.com.

Red-figure pottery is a type of Ancient Greek pottery that was popular from the late 6th century BC to the early 4th century BC. It was created by painting figures in red on a black background, as opposed to the earlier black-figure pottery, where figures were painted in black on a red background. The red-figure technique allowed for greater detail and realism in the depiction of human figures and scenes. It also allowed for more intricate designs and patterns to be added to the pottery. Red-figure pottery was used for a variety of purposes, including everyday household items such as cups and bowls, as well as more elaborate pieces such as vases and amphorae. Many of these pieces were decorated with scenes from mythology, history and everyday life. Some of the most famous examples of red-figure pottery come from the workshops of Athens, where artists such as Euphronios, Douris and the Kleophrades Painter produced some of the most intricate and beautiful pieces of their time. Today, red figurine pottery is highly prized by collectors and art lovers alike, and is considered one of the most important artistic achievements of ancient Greece.

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