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An assessment of the forest and range land situation in the United States (1981) (20155397078)

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An assessment of the forest and range land situation in the United States (1981) (20155397078)

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Title: An assessment of the forest and range land situation in the United States
Identifier: assessmentoffore22unit (find matches)
Year: 1981 (1980s)
Authors: United States. Forest Service
Subjects: Forests and forestry United States; Forest management United States; Rangelands United States
Publisher: Washington, D. C. : The Service : for sale by the Supt. of Docs. , U. S. GPO.
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library



Text Appearing Before Image:
Figure 2.4 Geographic Distribution of Coal, Oil Shale, and Tar Sands With Respect to Federally-Owned Lands
Text Appearing After Image:
Federal Lands I I Forest Service Lands PPi Bureau of Land Management Lands ^^H Other Federal Lands Coal, Oil Shale, and Tar Sands ^ west of the 100th meridian. But 44 percent of the western coal can be mined by stripping methods, while only about 19 percent of the eastern coal is strippable. Strippable western coalbeds are typically thick and low in sulfur, making them attractive for mining and for burning where sulfur oxide emissions must be kept low. Eastern coal beds are generally thin and high in sulfur, making them more difficult to mine and use than western coals. Generally, eastern coals are privately owned, whereas the Federal Government owns 60 percent of western coal re- sources. These facts suggest that, with good transpor- tation facilities and favorable freight rates. Federal coal under western forest and range lands will supply much of the projected demands. Iron production in 1985 is estimated at 129 million short tons and in 2000 at 159 million short tons. These figures represent production rates 40 percent and 73 percent above 1974. Forested private and State lands in Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin will likely supply the bulk of expected future produc- tion. Molybdenum production is also expected to rise sharply in response to domestic and foreign demand. Forest and range lands in Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico are expected to supply most of the pro- jected production. Production of nonmetals such as phosphate rock, sand and gravel, and stone is expected to roughly double by 2000. Most of the increase in phosphate rock production is expected to come from Federal forest and range lands in Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Montana. Most production of the other nonmetals is expected to come from private forest and range lands and be much more widely distributed geographically. It is generally acknowledged that Alaska has large mineral deposits, although their magnitude can only be speculated upon. The development of the petro- leum fields on the north slope of the Brooks Range is 51

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1981
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U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
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