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An air-to-air right side view of a Soviet Tu-95 Bear aircraft about 42 miles off the Virginia coast. The Cuba-based Tu-95 aircraft just penetrated the U.S. air defense zone to aerially view sea trials of the new nuclear-powered aircraft carrier CARL VINSON (CVN-70)

An air-to-air right side view of a Soviet Tu-95 Bear aircraft about 42 miles off the Virginia coast. The Cuba-based Tu-95 aircraft just penetrated the U.S. air defense zone to aerially view sea trials of the new nuclear-powered aircraft carrier CARL VINSON (CVN-70)

 
 
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Summary

The original finding aid described this photograph as:

Country: Atlantic Ocean (AOC)

Scene Camera Operator: LT Ronald Callaway

Release Status: Released to Public
Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

Aircraft carriers are warships that act as airbases for carrier-based aircraft. In the United States Navy, these consist of ships commissioned with hull classification symbols CV (aircraft carrier), CVA (attack aircraft carrier), CVB (large aircraft carrier), CVL (light aircraft carrier), CVN (aircraft carrier (nuclear propulsion) and CVAN (attack aircraft carrier (nuclear propulsion). The first aircraft carrier commissioned into the United States Navy was USS Langley (CV-1) on 20 March 1922.

The Tu-95 BEAR was perhaps the most successful bomber produced by Soviet aviation. It was the only bomber deployed by any country to use turboprop engines, which provided extraordinarily long endurance at speeds only slightly less than comparable turbojet-powered heavy bombers. The development of the Tu-95 intercontinental bomber began in the early 1950s. A team under Aleksandr A. Arkhangelsky, Tupolev’s longtime associate, designed the Tu-95 (“Bear”), a huge turboprop bomber that first flew in 1954 and became one of the most durable military aircraft ever built. A huge turboprop bomber first flew in 1954. Tu-95 bombers are still on the frontlines after more than 60 years in service. Two civilian aircraft were derived from these—the Tu-104, which appeared in 1955 and became one of the first jet transports to provide regular passenger service, and the Tu-114 long-range passenger plane, the largest propeller-driven aircraft ever in regular service.

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Date

26/01/1982
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Source

The U.S. National Archives
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