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All fours-important state of the game-the knave about to be lost

All fours-important state of the game-the knave about to be lost

 
 
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Summary

The presidential campaign of 1836 viewed as a card game by a satirist in sympathy with the Whigs. Opposing candidates Martin Van Buren (Democrat) and William Henry Harrison (Whig) face each other across a card table. Behind Van Buren stands his vice-presidential running mate Richard M. Johnson. Behind Harrison is incumbent President Andrew Jackson, who smokes a clay pipe and stands on tip-toes to spy on Harrison's hand. With his left hand he signals to Van Buren. Jackson: "What a h---ll of a hand old Harrison's got. I'm afraid Martin and Dick Johnson will go off with a flea in their ear." Johnson: "The old general is making signs that Harrison has the two highest trump cards and low. Martin he'll catch your Jack and then the jig's up! You'd better beg." Van Buren: "I ask one." Harrison: "Take it! now look out for your Jack!" On the wall above the table is a painting of the Battle of the Thames, one of Harrison's celebrated military victories a well as the occasion on which Johnson is reported to have slain the Indian chief Tecumseh. The print is probably by Robinson draughtsman Edward W. Clay, judging from its similarity to his "Grand Match Between the Kinderhook Poney ..." (no. 1836-14) and other signed work of the period.
Entered . . . 1836 by H.R. Robinson.
Published May 1836 by the proprietor H.R. Robinson, 48 Cortlandt St. N. York.
Title appears as it is written on the item.
Weitenkampf, p. 44.
Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)
Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-11.

Born: Feb. 9, 1773 Died: April 4, 1841 Presidential Term: March 4, 1841 - April 4, 1841 Vice President: John Tyler William Henry Harrison, American military officer ​and politician was the ninth President of the United States (1841), the oldest President to be ​elected at the time. Delivering the longest inaugural address in U.S. history, he came down with pneumonia that made his 30-day presidency the shortest in U.S. history. On his 32nd day, he became the first to die in office, serving the shortest tenure in U.S. Presidential history. "All the measures of the Government are directed to the purpose of making the rich richer and the poor poorer." /William Henry Harrison/

Martin Van Buren was the eighth President of the United States (1837-1841), after serving as the eighth Vice President and the tenth Secretary of State, both under President Andrew Jackson. While the country was prosperous when the "Little Magician" was elected, less than three months later the financial panic of 1837 punctured the prosperity. A member of the Democratic Party, he served in a number of senior roles, including eighth Vice President (1833–37) and tenth Secretary of State (1829–31), both under Andrew Jackson. Van Buren's inability as president to deal with the economic chaos of the Panic of 1837 and with the surging Whig Party led to his defeat in the 1840 election. "The less government interferes with private pursuits, the better for general prosperity."

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Date

01/01/1836
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Contributors

Robinson, Henry R., -1850.
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Source

Library of Congress
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