The World's Largest Public Domain Media Search Engine
Admiral Charles R. Larson, Commander in CHIEF, US Pacific Fleet, inspects several Soviet naval infantrymen near a Tu-95 Bear D aircraft during a tour of an air base. Larson is in the Soviet Union with two US Navy ships, the guided missile cruiser USS PRINCETON (CG-59) and the guided missile frigate USS REUBEN JAMES (FFG 57), for a four-day goodwill visit

Admiral Charles R. Larson, Commander in CHIEF, US Pacific Fleet, inspects several Soviet naval infantrymen near a Tu-95 Bear D aircraft during a tour of an air base. Larson is in the Soviet Union with two US Navy ships, the guided missile cruiser USS PRINCETON (CG-59) and the guided missile frigate USS REUBEN JAMES (FFG 57), for a four-day goodwill visit

 
 
description

Summary

The original finding aid described this photograph as:

Base: Vladivostok

State: Siberia

Country: U.S.S.R. (SUN)

Scene Camera Operator: PHCS Terry Mitchell

Release Status: Released to Public
Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

The Tu-95 BEAR was perhaps the most successful bomber produced by Soviet aviation. It was the only bomber deployed by any country to use turboprop engines, which provided extraordinarily long endurance at speeds only slightly less than comparable turbojet-powered heavy bombers. The development of the Tu-95 intercontinental bomber began in the early 1950s. A team under Aleksandr A. Arkhangelsky, Tupolev’s longtime associate, designed the Tu-95 (“Bear”), a huge turboprop bomber that first flew in 1954 and became one of the most durable military aircraft ever built. A huge turboprop bomber first flew in 1954. Tu-95 bombers are still on the frontlines after more than 60 years in service. Two civilian aircraft were derived from these—the Tu-104, which appeared in 1955 and became one of the first jet transports to provide regular passenger service, and the Tu-114 long-range passenger plane, the largest propeller-driven aircraft ever in regular service.

date_range

Date

10/09/1990
create

Source

The U.S. National Archives
copyright

Copyright info

No known copyright restrictions

ExploreFrigate

Explorefleet