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Adam Forepaugh and Sells Brothers America's greatest shows consolidated 8 lovely ladies as living statues illustrating famous art.

Adam Forepaugh and Sells Brothers America's greatest shows consolidated 8 lovely ladies as living statues illustrating famous art.

description

Summary

Circus poster showing female figures posed as "An offering to Cupid," "The Sabines," "The Three Graces, lost in the Catacombs," "Youth of Bacchus," and "Rape of Polyxena."
Captioned: Faultless female forms posing upon a great revolving pedestal. In classic, chaste and fascinating perfect facsimiles of master marble groups and pictures. An original genuine 20th century triumph in which imitation charmingly surpasses reality. Rivaling and reproducing the rarest treasures of the world's most noted studios and Galleries. Elevating, educating and entrancing.
Copyright by the Strobridge Litho. Co.
Title from item.

Alois Senefelder, the inventor of lithography, introduced the subject of colored lithography in 1818. Printers in other countries, such as France and England, were also started producing color prints. The first American chromolithograph—a portrait of Reverend F. W. P. Greenwood—was created by William Sharp in 1840. Chromolithographs became so popular in American culture that the era has been labeled as "chromo civilization". During the Victorian times, chromolithographs populated children's and fine arts publications, as well as advertising art, in trade cards, labels, and posters. They were also used for advertisements, popular prints, and medical or scientific books.

date_range

Date

01/01/1896
place

Location

create

Source

Library of Congress
copyright

Copyright info

Public Domain

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