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Voyagers

In 1977, Voyager 1 and 2 started their one-way journey to the end of the solar system and beyond, now traveling a million miles a day. Jimmy Carter was president when NASA launched two probes from Cape Canaveral. Voyager 1 and its twin, Voyager 2, were initially meant to explore Jupiter, Saturn, and their moons. They did that. But then they kept going at a rate of 35,000 miles per hour.
Each craft bears an object that is a record, both dubbed the Golden Records. They were the product of Carl Sagan and his team who produced a record that would, if discovered by aliens, represent humanity and "communicate a story of our world to extraterrestrials."
The Sounds of Earth
731 Media in collectionpage 1 of 8

Cresent Europa

(September 12, 1996) This mosaic of Europa, the smallest Galilean satellite, was taken by Voyager 2. This face of Europa is centered at about the 300 degree meridian. The bright areas are probably ice deposits,... more

Voyager First Science Meeting

This archival image was released as part of a gallery comparing JPL's past and present, commemorating the 80th anniversary of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Oct. 31, 2016. In December 1972, the science st... more

Voyager 2 Launch

(August 20, 1977) Voyager 2 was launched August 20, 1977, sixteen days before Voyager 1 aboard a Titan-Centaur rocket. Their different flight trajectories caused Voyager 2 to arrive at Jupiter four months later... more

The Sounds of Earth

Flying aboard Voyagers 1 and 2 are identical golden records, carrying the story of Earth far into deep space. The 12 inch gold-plated copper discs contain greetings in 60 languages, samples of music from differ... more

The Sounds of Earth Record Cover

This gold aluminum cover was designed to protect the Voyager 1 and 2 Sounds of Earth gold-plated records from micrometeorite bombardment, but also serves a double purpose in providing the finder a key to playin... more

Voyager Spacecraft During Vibration Testing

Two Voyager spacecraft were launched in 1977 to explore the outer planets and some of their satellites. A prototype Voyager spacecraft is shown at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, as it... more

Voyager Saturn Mission Artwork (Mariner - Jupiter - Saturn - Uranus) show slingshot technique ARC-1977-A77-0851

Voyager Saturn Mission Artwork (Mariner - Jupiter - Saturn - Uranus) show slingshot technique

Saturn Voyager Mission Artwork with instruments and parts labeled ARC-1977-AC77-0850

Saturn Voyager Mission Artwork with instruments and parts labeled

Artist: unknown (JPL) Saturn Voyager Mission Artwork depicts the spacecraft's path on it's journey to Saturn as it passed above the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and around Jupiter. ARC-1977-AC77-0849

Artist: unknown (JPL) Saturn Voyager Mission Artwork depicts the spacecraft's path on it's journey to Saturn as it passed above the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and around Jupiter.

Artist: unknown (JPL) Saturn Voyager Mission Artwork depicts the spacecraft's path on it's journey to Saturn as it passed above the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and around Jupiter. ARC-1977-A77-0849

Artist: unknown (JPL) Saturn Voyager Mission Artwork depicts the spacecraft's path on it's journey to Saturn as it passed above the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and around Jupiter.

Launch Vehicles

The Voyager 2 aboard Titan III-Centaur launch vehicle lifted off on August 20, 1977. The Voyager 2 was a scientific satellite to study the Jupiter and the Saturn planetary systems including their satellites and... more

Launch Vehicles

The Voyager 1 aboard the Titan III/Centaur lifted off on September 5, 1977, joining its sister spacecraft, the Voyager 2, on a mission to the outer planets.

Jupiter System Montage

(March 1979) Jupiter and its four planet-size moons, called the Galilean satellites, were photographed in early March 1979 by Voyager 1 and assembled into this collage. They are not to scale but are in their re... more

Jupiter's Great Red Spot

(March 1, 1979) As Voyager 1 flew by Jupiter, it captured this photo of the Great Red Spot. The Great Red Spot is an anti-cyclonic (high- pressure) storm on Jupiter that can be likened to the worst hurricanes o... more

Voyager 1 Image of Ganymede

(March 4, 1979) Voyager 1 took this picture of Ganymede from a distance of 1.6 million miles. Ganymede is Jupiter's largest satellite with a radius of approximately 2600 kilometers, about 1.5 times that of Eart... more

VOYAGER I SPACECRAFT

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 8/15/1979 Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

PLANET JUPITER AND ITS SATELLITES PHOTOGRAPHED BY THE VOYAGER SPACECRAFT

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 6/5/1979 Photographer: COPY NEGATIVE Keywords: 1979_02325.jpg c1979_02300s Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

Space Science

On February 5, 1979, Voyager 1 made its closest approach to Jupiter since early 1974 and 1975 when Pioneers 10 and 11 made their voyages to Jupiter and beyond. Voyager 1 completed its Jupiter encounter in early... more

Photo by Voyager 1 (JPL) Jupiter, its Great Red Spot and three of its four largest satellites are visible in this photo taken Feb 5, 1979 by Voyager 1. The spacecraft was 28.4 million kilomters (17.5 million miles) from the planet at the time. The inner-most large satellite, Io, can be seen against Jupiter's disk. Io is distinguished by its bright, brown-yellow surface. To the right of Jupiter is the satellite Europa, also very bright but with fainter surface markings. The darkest satellite, Callisto (still nearly twice as bright as Earth's Moon), is barely visible at the bottom left of the picture. Callisto shows a bright patch in its northern hemisphere. All tThree orbit Jupiter in the equatorial plane, and appear in their present position because Voyageris above the plane. All three satellites show the same face to Jupiter always -- just as Earth's Moon always shows us the same face. In this photo we see the sides of the satellites that always face away from the planet. Jupiter's colorfully banded atmosphere displays complex patterns highlighted by the Great Red Spot, a large, circulating atmospheric disturbance. This photo was assembled from three black and white negatives by the Image Processing Lab at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. JPL manages and controls the Voyage Project for NASA's Office of Space Science. (ref: P-21083) ARC-1969-AC79-0164-2

Photo by Voyager 1 (JPL) Jupiter, its Great Red Spot and three of its four largest satellites are visible in this photo taken Feb 5, 1979 by Voyager 1. The spacecraft was 28.4 million kilomters (17.5 million mi... more

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) above Jupiter's clouds. Although both satellites have about the same brightness, Io's color is very different from Europa's. Io's equatorial region show two types of material -- dark orange, broken by several bright spots -- producing a mottled appearance. The poles are darker and reddish. Preliminary evidence suggests color variations within and between the polar regions. Io's surface composition is unknown, but scientists believe it may be a mixture of salts and sulfur. Erupoa is less strongly colored, although still relatively dark at short wavelengths. Markings on Eruopa are less evident that on the other satellites, although this picture shows darker regions toward the trailing half of the visible disk. Jupiter at this point is about 20 million kilometers (12.4 million miles) from the spacecraft. At this resolution (about 400 kimometers or 250 miles) there is evidence of circular motion in Jupiter's atmosphere. While the dominant large-scale motions are west-to-east, small-scale movement includes eddy-like circulation within and between the bands. (JPL ref: P-21082) ARC-1979-A79-0164-1

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) abo... more

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) above Jupiter's clouds. Although both satellites have about the same brightness, Io's color is very different from Europa's. Io's equatorial region show two types of material -- dark orange, broken by several bright spots -- producing a mottled appearance. The poles are darker and reddish. Preliminary evidence suggests color variations within and between the polar regions. Io's surface composition is unknown, but scientists believe it may be a mixture of salts and sulfur. Erupoa is less strongly colored, although still relatively dark at short wavelengths. Markings on Eruopa are less evident that on the other satellites, although this picture shows darker regions toward the trailing half of the visible disk. Jupiter at this point is about 20 million kilometers (12.4 million miles) from the spacecraft. At this resolution (about 400 kimometers or 250 miles) there is evidence of circular motion in Jupiter's atmosphere. While the dominant large-scale motions are west-to-east, small-scale movement includes eddy-like circulation within and between the bands. (JPL ref: P-21082) ARC-1979-AC79-0164-1

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) abo... more

Europa, taken from Voyager 1 to Jupiter

Range : 5.9 million kilometers (3.66 million miles) Europa is Jupiter's 2nd Galilean satellites from the planet and the brightest. Photo taken early morning through violet filter. Faint swirls and linear patt... more

Jupiter as seen by Voyager 1, mosaic of planet. (JPL ref. No. P-21147) ARC-1979-AC79-7009

Jupiter as seen by Voyager 1, mosaic of planet. (JPL ref. No. P-21147)

Jupiter as seen by Voyager 1, mosaic of Jupiter's Satellite Io. (JPL ref. No. P-21206) ARC-1979-A79-7015

Jupiter as seen by Voyager 1, mosaic of Jupiter's Satellite Io. (JPL ref. No. P-21206)

Jupiter as seen by Voyager 1, mosic of Great Red Spot. (JPL ref. No. P-21203) ARC-1979-AC79-7012

Jupiter as seen by Voyager 1, mosic of Great Red Spot. (JPL ref. No. P-21203)

Voyager 1's look at Jupiter's moon Io JPL ref No. P-21457 ARC-1979-AC79-7114

Voyager 1's look at Jupiter's moon Io JPL ref No. P-21457

Voyager 1 spacecraft Jupiter moon Ganymede ARC-1979-A79-7120

Voyager 1 spacecraft Jupiter moon Ganymede

As Voyager 1 approches Jupiter three of its moons can be seen JPL ref. No. C-206 ARC-1979-AC79-7111

As Voyager 1 approches Jupiter three of its moons can be seen JPL ref. No. C-206

Voyager 1 view Io in its orbit around Jupiter ARC-1979-A79-7115

Voyager 1 view Io in its orbit around Jupiter

Voyager 1 catches volcanic eruption on Jupiter's moon Io JPL - no available ARC-1979-A79-7116

Voyager 1 catches volcanic eruption on Jupiter's moon Io JPL - no available

Voyager 1 catches volcanic eruption on Jupiter's moon Io JPL ref No. P-21334 ARC-1979-AC79-7113

Voyager 1 catches volcanic eruption on Jupiter's moon Io JPL ref No. P-21334

Voyager 1 close up image of Jupiter moon Io JPL ref. No. P-21277 ARC-1979-AC79-7112

Voyager 1 close up image of Jupiter moon Io JPL ref. No. P-21277

P-21756 BW only Range: 120,000 km (right) 169,000 km (left) Right: In the foreground of this picture taken by Voyager 2, the part of the surface of Ganymede shown is the typical grooved terrain as seen by Voyager 1. It consists of mutually intersecting bands of closely-spaced, parallel ridges and grooves. In the background is newly-cratered dark terrain across which can be traced several widely spaced parellel linear features. When viewed from a distance the line features appear to trace broad circular areas. The features resemble the circular ridges on Callisto that surround an almost complete annealed impact basin. The feature on Ganymede may be of similar origin but all traces of the impact itself have been destroyed. Left: This picture of Ganymede shows that the dark contrast terrain is separated by bright bands of grooved terain. The band of closely spaced linear grooves in the foreground is 150 km across and appears to be offset by another narrow band at right angles, as though by faulting. A variety of ray patterns are seen around the craters. One is in the left of the picture, it has prominent dark rays around an inner bright halo. Other craters have dark haloes; others have diffuse bright rays. The variation of albedo patterns around the craters may be indications of layering in the surface materials. The intensity of the craters suggests the dark areas are extremely old. The bright grooved terrain is less cratered and probably somewhat younger. ARC-1979-A79-7085

P-21756 BW only Range: 120,000 km (right) 169,000 km (left) Right: In the foreground of this picture taken by Voyager 2, the part of the surface of Ganymede shown is the typical grooved terrain as seen by Voya... more

P-21758 BW Range: 246,000 kilometers (152,000 miles) This picture by Voyager 2 is the first close look ever obtained of Jupiter's satellite, Europa. The linear crack-like features had been seen from a much greater distance by Voyager 1 but this image provides a resolution of about four kilometers (2.5 miles). The complicated linear features appear even more like cracks or huge fractures in these images. Also seen are somewhat darker mottled regions which appear to have a slightly pitted appearance, perhaps due to small scale craters. No large craters (more than five kilometers in diameter) are easily identifiable in the Europa photographs to date, suggesting that this satellite has a young surface relative to Ganymede and Callisto, although not perhaps as young as Io's. Various models for Europa's structure will be tested during analysis of these images, including the possibility that the surface is a thin ice crust overlying water or softer ice and that the fracture systems seen are breaks in that crust. Resurfacing mechanisms such as production of fresh ice or snow along the cracks and cold glacier-like flows are being considered as possibilities for removing evidence of impact events. Europa thus appears to truly be a satellite with many properties intermediate between Ganymede and Io. ARC-1979-A79-7087

P-21758 BW Range: 246,000 kilometers (152,000 miles) This picture by Voyager 2 is the first close look ever obtained of Jupiter's satellite, Europa. The linear crack-like features had been seen from a much grea... more

Range : 312, 000 kilometers (195,000 miles) This photo of Ganymede (Ice Giant) was taken from Voyager 2 and shows features down to about 5 to 6 kilometers across. Different types of terrain common on Ganymede's surface are visible. The boundary of the largest region of dark ancient terrain on Ganymede can be seen to the east (right), revealing some of the light linear features which may be all that remains of a large ancient impact structure similar to the large ring structure on Callisto. The broad light regions running through the image are the typical grooved structures seen within another example of what might be evidence of large scale lateral motion in Ganymede's crust. The band of grooved terrain (about 100 kilometers wide) in this region appears to be offset by 50 kilometers or more on the left hand edge by a linear feature perpendicular to it. A feature similar to this one was previously discovered by Voyager 1. These are the first clear examples of strike-slip style faulting on any planet other than Earth. Many examples of craters of all ages can be seen in this image, ranging from fresh, bright ray craters to large, subdued circular markings thought to be the 'scars' of large ancient impacts that have been flatteded by glacier-like flows. ARC-1979-AC79-7095

Range : 312, 000 kilometers (195,000 miles) This photo of Ganymede (Ice Giant) was taken from Voyager 2 and shows features down to about 5 to 6 kilometers across. Different types of terrain common on Ganymede... more

Frosch Awarded Goddard Memorial Trophy

Former President Jimmy Carter presents the National Space Club's Goddard Memorial Trophy to NASA Administrator Dr. Robert A. Frosch on behalf of the team that planned and executed the Voyager mission to Jupiter... more

Solar System Montage of Voyager Images

This montage of images taken by the Voyager spacecraft of the planets and four of Jupiter's moons is set against a false-color Rosette Nebula with Earth's moon in the foreground. Studying and mapping Jupiter, S... more

Saturn System Montage

(November 17, 1980) This montage of images of the Saturnian system was prepared from an assemblage of images taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during its Saturn encounter in November 1980. This artist's view sh... more

Solar System Montage

This is a montage of planetary images taken by spacecraft managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. Included are (from top to bottom) images of Mercury, Venus, Earth (and Moon), Mars, Jupiter, S... more

PEOPLE VIEWING VOYAGER I SPACECRAFT ON LARGE SCREEN IN THE VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER VIC

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 11/13/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 8 Location Room: AUD Photographs Relating to Agency Activities,... more

PEOPLE VIEWING VOYAGER I SPACECRAFT ON LARGE SCREEN IN THE VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER VIC

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 11/13/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 8 Location Room: AUD Photographs Relating to Agency Activities,... more

Space Science

Voyager 1 passed the Saturnian system in November 1980; nine months later Voyager 2 passed through this same system. The ensuing scientific discoveries were unprecedented with regards to the rings around Saturn... more

Saturn's Rings

(August 23, 1981) This Voyager 2 view, focusing on Saturn's C-ring (and to a lesser extent, the B- ring at top and left) was compiled from three separate images taken through ultraviolet, clear and green filter... more