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SpaceX

To the extent possible under law, www.spacex.com has waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to their work.
Falcon Heavy Demo Mission
1999
1999
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2019
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2019
2,248 Media in collectionpage 1 of 23

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Ready to put spades to work at ground-breaking ceremonies for SpaceX's new Falcon 9 rocket launch facilities at Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral are (from left) Thad Altman, Florida State representative; Jeff Kottkamp, Florida State Lt. Governor; Elon Musk, founder and CEO of Space Exploration Technologies; Brig. Gen. Susan J. Helms, commander of the U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing; Lynda Weatherman, Brevard County Economic Development Commission CEO and president; Steve Koehler, president of Space Florida; Janet Petro, deputy director of NASA Kennedy Space Center; Patricia Grace Smith, FAA associate administrator for Commercial Space Transportation; and Steve Cain, NASA Kennedy Space Center COTS project manager. As part of NASA’s Commercial Orbital Transportation Services, or COTS, competition, SpaceX will launch a Falcon 9 with a cargo-carrying payload on a series of three demonstration missions from Cape Canaveral to the International Space Station, culminating with the delivery of supplies to the $100 billion dollar orbiting laboratory. SpaceX intends to demonstrate its launch, maneuvering, berthing and return abilities by 2009 – a year before NASA has scheduled the conclusion of Space Shuttle operations. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3062

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Ready to put spades to work at ground-breaking ceremonies for SpaceX's new Falcon 9 rocket launch facilities at Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral are (from left) Thad Altm... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – An aerial view of Space Launch Complex 40 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The pad will be used to support the new Falcon rockets to be launched by Space Exploration Technologies, known as SpaceX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5790

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – An aerial view of Space Launch Complex 40 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The pad will be used to support the new Falcon rockets to be launched by Space Exploration Technologies, kn... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Chuck Hardison, the production and ground operations manager of The Boeing Co.'s Commercial Crew Transportation System, talks to media about plans to take NASA astronauts to the International Space Station in Orbiter Processing Facility-3 (OPF-3) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Boeing is maturing its CST-100 spacecraft design for NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) under the Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) activities. Boeing's current design shows the CST-100 taking up to seven astronauts and cargo to the space station or other low Earth orbit destinations by the middle of the decade. Through an agreement with NASA and Space Florida, Boeing is leasing OPF-3, the Processing Control Facility (PCC) and Space Shuttle Main Engine Shop at Kennedy to design, manufacture, process and integrate the CST-100. This work is expected to generate up to 550 engineering and technical jobs for Florida's Space Coast. Hardison explained that the CST-100 will be manufactured using a spin-form technology, which is expected to bring down the cost and safety concerns of a traditional welded spacecraft. It's innovations such as this that CCP hopes will drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before. Seven aerospace companies are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. (ATK) of Promontory, Utah, Blue Origin of Kent, Wash., The Boeing Co., of Houston, Excalibur Almaz Inc. of Houston, Sierra Nevada Corp. of Louisville, Colo., Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, Calif., and United Launch Alliance (ULA) of Centennial, Colo. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/exploration/commercial Photo credit: Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-7884

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Chuck Hardison, the production and ground operations manager of The Boeing Co.'s Commercial Crew Transportation System, talks to media about plans to take NASA astronauts to the Internat... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The pressurized vessel of The Boeing Co.'s Commercial Crew Transportation System, which could take NASA astronauts to the International Space Station, is on display in Orbiter Processing Facility-3 (OPF-3) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Boeing is maturing its CST-100 spacecraft design for NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) under the Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) activities. Boeing's current design shows the CST-100 taking up to seven astronauts and cargo to the space station or other low Earth orbit destinations by the middle of the decade. Through an agreement with NASA and Space Florida, Boeing is leasing OPF-3, the Processing Control Facility (PCC) and Space Shuttle Main Engine Shop at Kennedy to design, manufacture, process and integrate the CST-100. This work is expected to generate up to 550 engineering and technical jobs for Florida's Space Coast. Chuck Hardison, Boeing's production and ground operations manager, explained that the CST-100 will be manufactured using a spin-form technology, which is expected to bring down the cost and safety concerns of a traditional welded spacecraft. It's innovations such as this that CCP hopes will drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before. Seven aerospace companies are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. (ATK) of Promontory, Utah, Blue Origin of Kent, Wash., The Boeing Co., of Houston, Excalibur Almaz Inc. of Houston, Sierra Nevada Corp. of Louisville, Colo., Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, Calif., and United Launch Alliance (ULA) of Centennial, Colo. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/exploration/commercial Photo credit: Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-7883

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The pressurized vessel of The Boeing Co.'s Commercial Crew Transportation System, which could take NASA astronauts to the International Space Station, is on display in Orbiter Processing... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Media learn about the plans Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) has to take NASA astronauts to the International Space Station at Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. SpaceX is working to make its Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon capsule safe for humans for NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) under the Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) activities. SpaceX already is developing these systems under NASA's Commercial Orbital Transportation System (COTS) Program to take supplies to the space station. Scott Henderson, director of SpaceX mission assurance, explained that the company is drafting designs to make the Dragon capsule crew-capable with life support systems while meeting CCP's safety requirements. One such option under discussion is a launch abort system that would push astronauts away from the launch pad in the event of an emergency, which is different than traditional pull systems. It's the freedom to develop innovative solutions such as this that CCP hopes will drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before. CCP, which is based at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, partnered with seven aerospace companies to mature launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. (ATK) of Promontory, Utah, Blue Origin of Kent, Wash., The Boeing Co., of Houston, Excalibur Almaz Inc. of Houston, Sierra Nevada Corp. of Louisville, Colo., Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, Calif., and United Launch Alliance (ULA) of Centennial, Colo. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/exploration/commercial Photo credit: Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-7885

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Media learn about the plans Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) has to take NASA astronauts to the International Space Station at Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Air ... more