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Aesop Fables. Gherardo, del Fora, Illuminator, 1480

Aesop Fables. Gherardo, del Fora, ca. 1444-1497 (Illuminator). Florence, 1480Created by: PICRYLDated: 1480
The braggart [cont.]; The man who promised the impossible.
Aesop Fables. Gherardo, del Fora, ca. 1444-1497 (Illuminator). Florence, 1480.

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150 Media in collectionpage 1 of 2
The wild boar and the fox [cont.]; The crested lark; The fawn and the deer.
Bookplate of Hilprand Brandenburg de Bibrach
Description of the book.
The broken vow [end]; The frogs and the dried-up pond.
Title page; The eagle and the fox.
The eagle and the fox [cont.].
The eagle and the fox [end]; The eagle and the beetle.
The eagle and the beetle [cont.].
The eagle and the beetle [end].
The nightingale and the sparrow hawk.
The nightingale and the sparrow hawk [cont.]; The fox and the goat.
The fox and the goat [cont.].
The fox and the goat [end]; The fox who had never seen a lion.
The weasel and the rooster.
The weasel and the rooster [cont.]; The fox with the cropped tail.
The fox with the cropped tail [cont.]; The fox and the bramble.
The fox and the bramble [cont.]; The fox and the crocodile.
The fox and the crocodile [cont.]; The roosters and the partridge.
The roosters and the partridge [cont.]; The fox and the mask.
The fox and the mask [cont.]; The coal man and the fuller.
The coal man and the fuller [cont.]; The fishermen who caught stones.
The fishermen who caught stones [cont.]; The braggart.
The braggart [cont.]; The man who promised the impossible.
The man who promised the impossible [cont.]; The cheat.
The cheat [cont.]; The fishermen and the tuna.
The fishermen and the tuna [cont.]; The broken vow.
The broken vow [cont.].
The frogs and the dried-up pond [cont.]; The old man and death.
The old man and death [cont.]; The old woman and the doctor.
The old woman and the doctor [cont.].
The old woman and the doctor [end]; The farmer and his children.
The farmer and his children [cont.]; The farmer and his dogs.
The farmer and his dogs [cont.]; The woman and the hen.
The woman and the hen [cont.]; Dog bites man.
Dog bites man [cont.]; The two boys and the butcher.
The two boys and the butcher [cont.]; The fox and the monkey king.
The fox and the monkey king [cont.].
The fox and the monkey king [end]; The tuna and the dolphin.
The tuna and the dolphin [cont.]; The doctor and his patient.
The doctor and his patient [cont.]; The bird catcher and the viper.
The bird catcher and the viper [cont.]; The castor.
The castor [cont.]; The dog and the butcher.
The dog and the butcher [cont.]; The sleeping dog and the wolf.
The sleeping dog and the wolf [cont.]; The dog, the rooster, and the fox.
The dog, the rooster, and the fox [cont.].
The dog, the rooster, and the fox [end]; The lion and the frog; The lion, the donkey, and the fox.
The lion, the donkey, and the fox [cont.]; The lion, the bear, and the fox.
The lion, the bear, and the fox [cont.]; The fortune-teller.
The fortune-teller [cont.]; The ant and the dove.
The ant and the dove [cont.]; The bat, the thorn, and the gull.
The bat, the thorn, and the gull [cont.].
The bat, the thorn, and the gull [cont.].
The bat, the thorn, and the gull [end]; The donkey and the gardener.
The donkey and the gardener [cont.]; The bird catcher and the crested lark.
The bird catcher and the crested lark [cont.]; Hermes and the traveler.
Hermes and the traveler [cont.]; The thieving child and his mother.
The thieving child and his mother [cont.].
The thieving child and his mother [end]; The shepherd and the sea.
The shepherd and the sea [cont.]; The pomegranate, the apple, and the olive trees, and the thornbush.
The pomegranate, the apple, and the olive trees, and the thornbush [cont.]; The mole and his mother.
The mole and his mother [cont.]; The wasps, the partridges, and the farmer.
The wasps, the partridges, and the farmer [cont.]; The peacock and the jackdaw.
The peacock and the jackdaw [cont.]; The wild boar and the fox.
The fawn and the deer [cont.]; The hares and the frogs.
The hares and the frogs [cont.].
The hares and the frogs [end]; The donkey who envied the horse's life.
The donkey who envied the horse's life [cont.]; The miser.
The miser [cont.]; The greese and the cranes.
The greese and the cranes [cont.]; The tortoise and the eagle.
The tortoise and the eagle [cont.]; The flea and the man.
The flea and the man [cont.]; The blind doe.
The blind doe [cont.]; The doe and the lion; The doe and the vines.
The doe and the vines [cont.]; The donkey, the rooster, and the lion.
The donkey, the rooster, and the lion [cont.]; The gardener and the dog.
The sow and the dog; The snake and the crab.
The snake and the crab [cont.]; The shepherd and the wolf.
The shepherd and the wolf [cont.]; The lion, the wolf, and the fox.
The lion, the wolf, and the fox [cont.].
The lion, the wolf, and the fox [end]; The woman and the drunkard.
The woman and the drunkard [cont.].
The woman and the drunkard [end]; The boar and the mouse; The donkey in the lion's skin.
The donkey in the lion's skin [cont.]; The sparrow.
The swallow and the crow; The nightingale and the bat.
The nightingale and the bat [cont.]; The snails.
The snails [cont.]; The woman and the servants.
The woman and the servants [cont.]; The magician.
The magician [cont.]; The weasel and the file; The farmer and the goddess fortune.
The farmer and the goddess fortune [cont.]; The travelers and the axe.
The travelers and the axe [cont.]; The frogs.
The frogs [cont.]; The beekeeper.
The beekeeper [cont.]; The kingfisher.
The kingfisher [cont.].
The kingfisher [end]; The fisherman.
The fisherman [cont.]; The monkey and the dolphin.
The monkey and the dolphin [cont.]; The flies.
The flies [cont.]; Hermes and the sculptor.
Hermes and the sculptor [cont.]; Hermes and Tiresias.
Hermes and Tiresias [cont.].
Hermes and Tiresias [end]; The two dogs.
The two dogs [cont.]; The man and the shrew.
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